All Articles containing the tag: OSCE MISSION UKRAINE

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Security and Human Rights Monitor


INTERVIEW with Alexander Hug, Deputy Chief Monitor: Political will has to be translated into operational instructions on the ground
Photo: OSCE/Evgeniy Maloletka
24 February 2015 - Stephanie Liechtenstein - 0

INTERVIEW with Alexander Hug, Deputy Chief Monitor: Political will has to be translated into operational instructions on the ground

On 12 February 2015 a package of measures was agreed in Minsk, which serves as an implementation plan of the September 2014 Minsk Agreements. The package of measures was signed by the Contact Group, after the so-called Normandy group of states (consisting of Germany, Russia, Ukraine and France) engaged in marathon negotiations in Minsk in order to bring an end to renewed bloodshed and fighting in eastern Ukraine. In this interview, Alexander Hug, Deputy Chief Monitor of the OSCE Special Monitoring Mission to Ukraine states that on 21 February OSCE monitors were able to enter Debaltseve for the first time. He also explains why he believes that additional technological equipment could help the unarmed civilian monitoring mission to perform its tasks efficiently, especially in light of the volatile security situation. In his opinion, what is needed the most though is that political will is translated into operational instructions on the ground.

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Thinking Out of the Box: OSCE Network of Think Tanks develops Options for Future OSCE Field Activities
Photo: OSCE/Evgeniy Maloletka
29 December 2014 - Stephanie Liechtenstein - 0

Thinking Out of the Box: OSCE Network of Think Tanks develops Options for Future OSCE Field Activities

On 3 December, the OSCE Network of Think Tanks and Academic Institutions presented a study on "the Future of OSCE Field Operations (Options)" at a side event during the 2014 OSCE Parallel Civil Society Conference in Basel. The Network consists of around 30 institutions and it describes itself as "an autonomous OSCE-related track II initiative." The Network's study should be seen in the context of the Helsinki+40 reform discussions, which have been going on since 2012 and which also include a debate on how OSCE field activities could be adapted in the context of a changing security environment.

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Interview with Alexander Hug: Special Monitoring Mission is the eyes and the ears of the international community in Ukraine
Photo: OSCE/Evgeniy Maloletka
8 September 2014 - Stephanie Liechtenstein - 2

Interview with Alexander Hug: Special Monitoring Mission is the eyes and the ears of the international community in Ukraine

The OSCE Special Monitoring Mission (SMM) to Ukraine is currently the only international presence that operates throughout Ukraine – including in the east and south-east of the country where fighting is taking place between the Ukrainian military and pro-Russian rebels. Since its inception in March 2014, the SMM has established an impressive network of contacts with all sides in Ukraine and has become the "eyes and ears of the international community on the ground in Ukraine". Alexander Hug, Deputy Chief Monitor of the OSCE SMM explains in this interview how the SMM operates in Ukraine. While he says that the security of the SMM personnel is "the most important parameter in the decision-making process", he adds that "a minimal risk remains." He also explains in the interview how the SMM was able to facilitate the access of experts to the crash site of the MH17 Malaysia Airlines jet and points out some of the limitations of a civilian monitoring mission. The interview was conducted by Stephanie Liechtenstein, Website Editor of Security and Human Rights on 2 September 2014.*

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OSCE to send Special Monitoring Mission to Ukraine
Photo: OSCE
24 March 2014 - Stephanie Liechtenstein - 0

OSCE to send Special Monitoring Mission to Ukraine

On 21 March, the OSCE Permanent Council adopted a decision to deploy a Special Monitoring Mission to Ukraine. After several weeks of intense negotiations, eventually all 57 participating States - including the Russian Federation – joined consensus on the mandate of the mission. The main stumbling block during the negotiations was not the composition of the mission but the operational modalities and especially the mission's area of deployment. The current mandate of the mission foresees "deployment throughout Ukraine", which is somewhat ambiguous language. In fact, the mission is allowed to enter nine regions throughout Ukraine, including the volatile southern and eastern part of Ukraine but excluding the Crimean peninsula. This should be seen as a compromise solution and not as acceptance by the international community that Crimea now belongs to Russia.

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